Giddy

Getting a revised version from an author makes me giddy.

No, seriously.

It’s like Christmas and my birthday, all rolled into one.

I’m sitting here, staring at the revised version of Erekos. Its author sent it to me two whole days ago, and I’ve just been sitting here, staring at it, ever since.

It’s not that I’m afraid to open it. Far from it, actually.

It’s that I’m savouring the anticipation. It’s like a gorgeously wrapped present, sitting on the table before me, with a big, fluffy Martha Stewart bow on top. I just know there’s something amazing inside – of course there is, it was a great manuscript to start with – but I don’t know just how amazing, and it practically gives me shivers to think about getting to read what she’s done with the few minor suggestions I passed along.

I know, I know, it’s silly – I should open it up, read the major rewritten section, and then get down to doing another editing run on the whole thing so that the manuscript can move on to the next phase of the publishing process.

But really, I just want to sit here and ogle my lovely present some more.

Speaking of the next phase of the publishing process, it’s dawned on me that a lot of writers don’t actually know what happens once they submit a manuscript for consideration, let alone what happens after one is accepted and moves into the editorial and design process. So I’m planning to do a series of posts describing all of this, in the hopes of making the publishing process as clear and transparent as possible, for everyone (whether involved or simply curious).

Are there any parts of the publishing process that you’re particularly mystified by? Anything you want explained? Comment, and I’ll make sure to tackle it in an upcoming post!

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4 Responses to “Giddy”

  1. Patti May 26, 2010 at 12:47 pm #

    Since I have very little clue how the publishing process works [manuscript is sent–magic happens–book is published], anything you share is going to be new and fascinating. My experience amounts to sending out my offering and getting a rejection slip back. What else can happen?

  2. Jason May 26, 2010 at 2:11 pm #

    “The whole process” is not a part, so I don’t think I can answer your question fairly… that said…

    That sense of anticipation and delayed gratification is something I understand – less so from the editorial standpoint, but definitely in other things, and in new books.

    There’s something about putting off a read you know will be good. You want to hold on to the anticipation, draw it out – because, by definition, if it’s good, once you start, there won’t be any more delaying, holding back, or rationing. When you’re looking at a good book, by a good writer, once you open it, once you start it, by the nature of the beast, that writer is going to pull you along relentlessly till it’s over. You’re not going to be able to take it slow, you won’t generally be of a mind to put it down and portion it out. Because it’s good, and because it’s well-written, it’s going to be over too soon. Don’t get me wrong, the end is going to be satisfying, too, but it’s still going to come too soon, and what will you do then? It’ll all be over. And then you’ll be waiting for the next book, and you’ll never read the one you just finished quite the same way again.

  3. Kate May 26, 2010 at 4:08 pm #

    @Jason: That’s exactly my problem. I try to delay starting as long as I can…because I know I’m not going to want to finish, because to finish means an end, and I want good writing and a good story to never end…

  4. Steve May 29, 2010 at 6:09 am #

    Since I have very little clue how the publishing process works [manuscript is sent–magic happens–book is published], anything you share is going to be new and fascinating. My experience amounts to sending out my offering and getting a rejection slip back. What else can happen?

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